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Move Over for Migrants

Move Over for Migrants

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Kara Moody graduated from Antioch University with a Master’s degree in Conservation Biology. She currently works for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service at Parker River National Wildlife Refuge in Newburyport, where she is continuing to study the effects of human disturbance on migratory shorebirds.

Project assistance was provided by The Trustees of Reservations and Franz Ingelfinger, former Northeast Regional Ecologist for The Trustees of Reservations. Funding for this study was provided by The Trustees of Reservations and through a grant from the William P. Wharton Trust.

This article originally appeared in Mass Wildife.

 

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By Kara Moody

Kicking a flock of birds into flight while walking down the beach at high tide may seem innocuous, but when such disturbances occur in the crucial habitats where shorebirds congregate to feed and rest between flights during migration, they are cause for concern. Fortunately, research indicates there are easy, effective solutions...

Watching a large flock of shorebirds fly in complete synchronization is an amazing sight. The birds swarm together in a dark mass, darting first one way, then another, as they swoop and dive in unison. Though shorebirds can offer an astounding show when they fly in large flocks, these random bursts of flight can mean trouble for the birds. Oftentimes these sudden explosions of flight occur because the birds have been disrupted by something, whether a potential predator or merely a nearby person. Such disturbances can cause serious problems for migratory shorebirds because unnecessary flights are a waste of valuable energy needed during migration.

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Kara Moody graduated from Antioch University with a Master’s degree in Conservation Biology. She currently works for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service at Parker River National Wildlife Refuge in Newburyport, where she is continuing to study the effects of human disturbance on migratory shorebirds.

Project assistance was provided by The Trustees of Reservations and Franz Ingelfinger, former Northeast Regional Ecologist for The Trustees of Reservations. Funding for this study was provided by The Trustees of Reservations and through a grant from the William P. Wharton Trust.

This article originally appeared in Mass Wildife.

 

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