Guide to Invasives

Heutte

Learn More

Find everything you've always wanted to know about invasives, including ideas for native altnernatives at Invasive.org.

Get the Outsmart Invasives app!

New England Wildflower Society offers a local guide to the spread of invasives in New England.

The Invasive Plant Atlas of New England is a comprehensive database of regional invasives.

Download The Trustees' guidelines on managing invasive plants.

Volunteer to help combat invasives at Trustees reservations.

They make look innocent enough in your backyard, but these invasive plants cause chaos to the local environment, crowding out native plants and impacting wildlife.  

Chris Evans, River to River CWMA, www.bugwood.org Garlic Mustard Leaves

Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata). This aggressive plant infests forest and open areas, displacing native plants, poisoning butterflies, and reducing wildlife habitat. Learn more and find native alternatives >> 

 

Goutweed, Bishop's Weed  Goutweed, Bishop's Weed

Goutweed, Bishop's weed (Aegopodium podagraria). Commonly used as groundcover, goutweed will aggressivle infest forest and open areas, displacing native plants, including tree seedlings. Learn more and find native alternatives >>

 

Oriental Bittersweet Oriental Bittersweet

Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus). This perennial vine with round to oval leaves will infest forest gaps and open areas, strangling trees and causing branches to break. It's pushing out native bittersweet. Learn more and find native alternatives >> 

 

Glossy Buckthorn Glossy Buckthorn - Mehrhoff

Glossy Buckthorn (Frangula alnus, Rhamnus frangula). This invasive shrub or small tree is poor food for wildlife. In addition, it will crowd out native plants, reducing wildlife habitat. Learn more and find native alternatives >> 

 

Japanese Knotweed - Manning  Japanese Knotweed - Heutte

Japanese Knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum). This perennial features hollow, bamboo-like stems up to 10' tall. It infests riverbanks, displacing native plants and reducing habitat for wildlife. Learn more and find native alternatives >>

 

Japanese Barberry - Mehrhoff Japanese Barberry - R.Old
Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii). This dense, spiny shrub can grow up to 8 feet tall. Its bright red berries make it deceptively pretty in the late summer, but it alters the chemistry of the soil in which it grows and reduces wildlife foraging. Learn more and find native alternatives >>