Special Places

As a Trustees member, you’ll receive our award-winning magazine, Special Places, published quarterly. Inside every issue you’ll find compelling articles and beautiful photography that connect you to The Trustees, to the places you love, and to conservation issues across Massachusetts. You’ll also find our extensive listings of events and volunteer opportunities near you.

Fall 2014

Protect
Protecting special places requires different approaches; from the traditional model of buying or acquiring properties, to assisting in the protection of land and cultural sites through other entities or individuals. Conservation restrictions are a powerful tool to help us carry out our work. By partnering with private landowners we can ensure the permanent conservation of their property as protected open space.

Steward
As suitable places to live dwindle for many species, The Trustees bear an increasing responsibility to the creatures that call our reservations home, and to restore habitat-types that were once ubiquitous across Massachusetts. With shovels in hand and funding from the Housatonic River Natural Resource Damages Fund, Trustees staff and volunteers have doubled the amount of floodplain forest along the banks of the Housatonic River at Bartholomew’s Cobble in Sheffield (pictured here). By removing invasives and planting more than 1,700 flood-friendly saplings, a forest-type depleted by centuries of agriculture and industry will soon host innumerable species as it works to slow damaging floodwaters and rebuild healthy soil.

Excite
After seven years as an affiliate organization, the Boston Natural Areas Network (BNAN) has fully merged to become part of The Trustees’ Boston Region. For BNAN’s many garden volunteers, supporters, and friends, the change will simply mean that the organizational support will be stronger and the newly integrated organization will have greater impact in its work with the collective statewide reach of The Trustees.

Grow
Why is this team from Breckinridge Capital Advisors smiling? Because they’ve just done a hard day’s worth of volunteering at Dover’s Powisset Farm. What does that mean for them? Sore muscles, dirty jeans, and a serious sense of accomplishment. What does that mean for The Trustees? Corporate support (both in the form of dollars and diggers), more capacity to grow and distribute fresh produce to the underserved, and more people getting to know the farm on an up-close-and-personal basis. This past year, our corporate volunteers made a tremendous impact on our organization by building boardwalks to improve public trail systems, harvesting vegetables for a local food pantry, pruning gardens that are enjoyed by thousands of visitors each year, and preparing row crops for a new season of growth. We’re grateful for the hours of sweat and skill folks like the Breckinridge team brought to the community this year.

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